Census Bureau Reduces Multiracial Population

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

January 21, 2020

Susan Graham

Project RACE

Email: susangraham@projectrace.com

 

CENSUS BUREAU REDUCES MULTIRACIAL POPULATION

San Joaquin Valley, CA -The United States Census Bureau has chosen to exclude the multiracial group from the 2020 Census by giving false instructions to biracial people who call or email the bureau for direction on how to fill out their census forms. They also have excluded the group from all marketing and advertising material, unlike they have done for every other racial and ethnic group. If a multiracial person does not fill in their census forms correctly, we lose the biracial/multiracial number, which could result in loss of benefits and funding.

Project RACE (Reclassify All Children Equally), is the national organization representing the multiracial population for the last 30 years. Susan Graham, president of Project RACE and author of Born Biracial: How One Mother Took on Race in America said, “We have attempted to resolve this issue for the past six months with Census Bureau personnel, including Director Steven Dillingham. The issue remains unresolved and will produce an inaccurate 2020 Census.”

According to Pew Research, there are almost seven million multiracial people in the United States. The multiracial population won the right to be counted on government forms by the OMB in 1997, although proper instructions—which include checking two or more race boxes—are key to counting everyone accurately.

 

See our 2020 Census Video here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v72NslaIFNs

 

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It’s Famous Friday!

 

Happy Friday Everyone. This week we are taking a look inside the life of teen actress and musical artist, Isabela Moner. Isabela was born in Cleveland, Ohio to Katherine Moner (Peruvian) and Patrick Moner (Caucasian). Isabela’s main language is Spanish, but she also speaks English. Additionally, she claims to have learned some Peruvian for her role in Dora and the Lost City of Gold.

 

Isabela says that performing has been a passion of hers from a young age, starting community theatre at only six. Her first major Broadway role came when she was ten, in the musical production Evita, where she performed alongside Latin-pop legend Ricky Martin. Her other Broadway appearance came in 2013 when she performed in a production of Dallas.

 

Since then Isabela has moved on to bigger roles in television and movies. From roughly 2014-2017 she starred in television shows such as, Dora and Friends: Into the City as well as 100 things to do before High School. Her performance in 100 things to do before High School led to 2 nominations for “best Actor/Actress” by Imagen Foundation Award, one of which she won in 2016.

 

After moving to movies, one of her early appearances was in Michaels Bay’s Transformers: The Last Knight, where she had the opportunity to work with actor Mark Wahlberg. Her part led to a nomination for “Choice Summer Movie Actress” in the 2017 Teen’s Choice Awards. One other major movie she worked on was Instant Family, where she plays “Lizzy”, a teenage orphan who eventually finds a family along with her two other siblings. Her convincing performance led to titles such as “Best Leading Young Actress” as well as “Best Actress-Feature Film”. Her work in movies also includes, Sicario: Days of the Soldado, Dora and the Lost City of Gold, Herself, and Middle School: The Worst Years of my Life. Her widespread success has landed her screen-time with major actors and actresses such as Rose Byrne, Benicio del Toro, Josh Brolin, and more.

 

Matheson Bossick, Project Race Teens Vice President

 

Sources:

  1. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isabela_Moner
  2. https://www.tvovermind.com/isabela-moner/
  3. https://www.broadwayworld.com/people/Isabela-Moner/
  4. https://www.forbes.com/sites/rosycordero/2019/03/07/isabela-moner-learned-indigenous-peruvian-language-to-play-dora-the-explorer/#bae84885ff6c

Picture From:

  1. https://www.newsweek.com/who-dora-and-lost-city-gold-star-isabela-moner-17-year-old-actress-bringing-1373475

It’s Famous Friday!

Pinckney Benton Stewart Pinchback

Happy new year!  As we celebrate the dawn of a new decade, our country eagerly and anxiously looks toward another presidential election year.  Since the time of Reconstruction, people of color have impacted our country’s legislation on a state and federal level.  This Famous Friday feature focuses on one early influencer by the name of Pinckney Benton Stewart Pinchback, or P.B.S. Pinchback as most commonly seen in historical references.

Pinchback was born in Macon, Georgia, in 1837, to William Pinchback a white planter, and Eliza Stewart, his former slave.  Unorthodox for the times, Pinchback was educated at Gilmore High School In Cincinnati, Ohio.  He also worked as a hotel porter in Indiana to avoid recapture by his paternal relatives after the death of his father.  While living in Indiana he married Nina Emily and had four sons and two daughters.

P.B.S. Pinchback’s knack for public and political leadership was recognized during the Civil War.  He was the only African American captain in the Union-controlled 1st Louisiana Native Guards. After the war, he became very active in the Republican party and organized the Fourth Ward Republican Club in New Orleans.  In 1868, he was elected to the Louisiana State Senate and also became the State Senate president pro tempore.  Three years later, he became the acting lieutenant governor.  In 1872, with the impeachment of incumbent governor Henry Clay Warmoth, P.B.S. Pinchback was sworn in as the first African American governor of Louisiana and non-white governor of any state in the United States. Although his term was only 35 days, Pinchback made history.  It would not be until 1990 that another African American person would sit as governor of any U.S. state.

P.B.S. Pinchback continued to remain active in politics by public service.  He was elected to both the U.S. House of Representatives and the U.S. Senate.  He served on the Louisiana State Board of Education and was instrumental in establishing Southern University in New Orleans which is a historically black college.  Finally, after attaining his law degree, he became a federal marshal in New York and then practiced law in Washington D.C. P.B.S. Pinchback died in 1921.

P.B.S. Pinchback was a trailblazer and fought for equality for people of color.  As the election year proceeds, may we continue to see others follow in his legendary footsteps.

 

Skylar Wooten, Project RACE Teens Vice President

 

Picture Source:https://www.britannica.com/biography/Pinckney-Benton-Stewart-Pinchback

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What Nelson Mandela Fought For

World of Weddings: Marriage of mixed-race couple in South Africa is “exactly what Nelson Mandela fought for”

In our weeklong series World of Weddings, we sent a team of correspondents around the globe to witness unique ceremonies and understand what marriage means in different cultures. In our third report, we take you to South Africa, where as recently as the 1980s mixed-race marriages were illegal under apartheid.


Two worlds collided as the Maselas and the Daltons came together in Pretoria, South Africa, for the marriage of their children Mante and Andrew. Once outlawed and punishable by prison, celebrating love across racial and cultural barriers would have been unimaginable in apartheid South Africa.

Although apartheid is over, weddings like Mante and Andrew’s are still the exception to the norm, CBS News correspondent Debora Patta reports.

“My grandmother, who unfortunately isn’t here to this day, she was more excited than anyone else because she’s like, ‘This is exactly what Nelson Mandela fought for,'” said the bride, Mante Maselas.

Mante is Pedi, one of South Africa’s many ethnic groups, and Andrew’s family is from England. The families gathered to negotiate a bride price known as lobola, traditionally a means to cement ties between two families. Lobola is a centuries-old tradition that used to be paid in cattle, but that’s a little complicated in modern times.

“At first I was a little bit skeptical because obviously, again, something’s new to me, but you have to go in with an open mind and you have to respect the culture and the family,” Andrew said. “And at the end of the day if I want to marry Mante, that’s something I’m going to have to do.”

The final amount is confidential, but a young well-educated woman like Mante could easily fetch up to 15 cows, the equivalent of just over $10,000.

As Mante got ready for her wedding ceremony, she acknowledged it’s not always easy being a modern couple navigating traditional African customs.

“We’re just doing what we need to do in this period to make our parents happy, and then we go back to our normal lives where we don’t have to fall into the gender roles,” she said.

In that moment she had a more pressing concern: “I am also worried about his dancing,” she said, laughing. “He’s been trying to practice the moves.”

At the ceremony, there also was a thoughtful, if slightly misplaced, nod to Andrew’s heritage: bagpipes. Nobody seemed to mind that Scotland and England are completely different nations. But, for the most part, was a thoroughly African affair, which included being schooled in how to be a good wife.

The traditional ceremony was part of 10 days of festivities, culminating in what many would regard as a thoroughly modern wedding at a wine farm just outside Cape Town.

That ceremony was very much Mante and Andrew’s event. Their friends flew in from around the world for the big day, part two. There were the usual wedding-day nerves and the bride’s almost obligatory late arrival, followed by the joyful walk down the aisle on her father’s arm. And then it was time to party, where Andrew’s dance moves were finally put to the test.

For family friends like Rudi Matjokane who lived through apartheid, there was even more cause to celebrate.

“Love knows no boundaries,” he said. “In those days, love would know boundaries because then you would be arrested for having it, so it’s the proudest day of my life.”

While weddings like this are still unusual, for Mante and Andrew it felt completely natural. They’re just two young people deeply in love.

Famous Friday Sneak Peek!

Famous Friday: Nandi Hildebrand

Happy Friday everybody. For this week’s Famous Friday, we are excited to share about teen actress, Nandi Hildebrand. We at Project RACE are proud to be partnering with Count the Nation, an initiative of USC Annenberg aiming to ensure that everyone across America knows how much census participation benefits their community. It is through this exciting and important partnership that we came to know Nandi who stars in Count the Nation’s awesome new census video (https://youtu.be/HYYG1w65U64). Nandi, whose father is Caucasian while her mother is African (Zulu), is a developing teen actress who has also used her influence to become a social activist.

Even at the young age of 15, Nandi has many special skills including acting, dance, athletics, and martial arts. Her acting experience has led to major roles in both television and theatre. One notable role was in the fourth season of NBC’s hit television show Fresh Off the Boat. Another hobby she has is reading, enjoying both fictional and nonfictional genres. Nandi credits her love of reading as well as traveling for her vast knowledge of cultures and philosophies.

Born in Maryland, Nandi has traveled all over the world, including growing up for a number of years in South Africa with her grandparents. When she was seven Nandi moved back to the United States. In Southern California, she became a victim of bullying due to her, “accent, [and] puffy hair,” and, “lack of knowledge about the popular culture”. But Nandi was determined to turn that difficulty into good. Recently, Nandi has utilized her platform to create Nandi’s Anti-Bullying Youth Club, a charity whose goal is to ensure that all children feel accepted in their environment. Members of the club are encouraged to gather and discuss their experiences with bullies. Nandi believes that she must spread awareness about this serious issue affecting so many young people. She shares that her long-term goal is for people to attempt to understand the backgrounds of their peers, rather than judging others because of pre-formalized prejudices.

After spending a short time in California, Nandi’s adventures continued as she toured Asia with her parents, mainly staying in Vietnam. These diverse opportunities, coupled with her own multiracial identity, have allowed her the opportunity to embrace a unique cultural perspective.

For more information on Count the Nation, please visit countthenation.org.

Matheson Bossick, Project RACE Teens Vice President

 

Sources:

  1. https://strongselfie.com/pages/beyondthebox
  2. http://www.nandihildebrand.com/
  3. http://www.nandihildebrand.com/acting/
  4. http://www.nandihildebrand.com/philanthropist/
  5. http://www.nandihildebrand.com/multi-talent/

Image From:

  1. http://www.nandihildebrand.com/

Did you forget something?

 

You’re a busy person. Taking care of business, family, relationships, and everything else you have to accomplish is overwhelming. Sometimes we forget things. Did you forget that today is Giving Tuesday? It’s a day to give to non-profit organizations so we can run more efficiently and represent you and your families.

Project RACE is the national organization responsible for making life easier for interracial families and multiracial individuals. We deal with Washington and communicate with every state in many different ways. We are not just a local group representing a small number of people.

Thank you for your invaluable support. For further donation information please go to http://www.projectrace.com/donate/

So please don’t forget us and if you remembered to give to us this year, we thank you once again.

 

The Project RACE Team and Supporters

Category: Blog · Tags: , ,

Multiracial in 2060

Research finds that members of the multiracial group are more likely to be miscategorized than members of any other racial group. Compared to categorizing people into a single-race category, categorizing someone as multiracial is more mentally cumbersome, takes longer and is less likely to occur.

 

By Marisa Franco – What Racial Discrimination Will Look Like in 2060 in Scientific American

Thank you!

We are thankful…

To those of you who chose to donate to Project RACE!

Our sincere gratitude for helping us continue our work.

Wishing you a very happy Thanksgiving.

Thank you for your invaluable support. For further donation information please go to http://www.projectrace.com/donate/

The Project RACE Team and Supporters

Category: Blog · Tags: , ,

Please Help!

 

Project RACE never requires a membership fee. We believe that all people, regardless of location or ability to pay, should be able to be a part of our advocacy. We are a non-profit, 501(c) (3) all-volunteer organization supported by individual donations, contributions and grants. Donations are deductible, as provided by law. If you believe in our cause, please consider making a difference for multiracial people. We are committed to keeping our administrative costs to a minimum and welcome all contributions in any amount. Scroll down to see how your donations are used.

Your donation to Project RACE will be used for:

  • Educational programs for children
  • Accounting, legal and other professional fees
  • Holding bone marrow donor drives
  • Ongoing work with the U.S. Census Bureau
  • Umbilical cord blood banking awareness
  • Mandatory state business fees
  • Website hosting costs
  • Marketing and public relations
  • General office supplies and postage
  • Printing and associated promotion costs
  • General operating expenses

Thank you for your invaluable support. For further donation information please go to http://www.projectrace.com/donate/

 

The Project RACE Team and Supporters

 

Thank you, Pew Research!

Multiracial in America