Famous Friday!

Famous Friday: Steph Curry
<> on June 15, 2017 in Oakland, California.

 on June 15, 2017 in Oakland, California.

As a Clevelander and huge Cavs fan, it hurts to write this, but this week’s Famous Friday is Steph Curry. Wardell Stephen Curry was born on March 14, 1988 in Akron, OH, in the same hospital where the King, Lebron James, was born.  As of this week he is also a two time NBA Champion. Sadly, on Monday night the Golden State Warriors defeated the Cleveland Cavaliers to take the NBA championship. Steph is also a 2 two time NBA MVP, 4 time NBA all-star, and one the leagues most famed players. The Warriors may not be my team, but I can give credit where it’s due and Steph and his team played an incredible season and deserve the title.
There’s a lot of talk about Steph’s race, which my research tells me is African American and Creole, but today when they ask  the question so many of us get, “what is Steph Curry?” The answer is simply “Champion”!

Census: US More Diverse

Census: US more diverse, white population grows least

Every ethnic and racial group grew between 2015 and 2016, but the number of whites continued to increase at the slowest rate — less than one hundredth of 1 percent, or 5,000 people, the Census estimate shows. That’s a fraction of the rates of growth for non-white Hispanics, Asians and people who said they are multi-racial, according to the government’s annual estimates of population.

President Donald Trump’s core support in the racially divisive 2016 election came from white voters, and polls showed that it was especially strong among those who said they felt left behind in an increasingly racially diverse country. In fact, the Census Bureau projects whites will remain in the majority in the U.S. until after 2040.

“Even then, (whites) will still represent the nation’s largest plurality of people, and even then they will still inherit the structural advantages and legacies that benefit people on the basis of having white skin,” said Justin Gest, author of “The New Minority,” a book about the 2016 election.

AN AGING NATION

The Census Bureau reported that the median age of Americans — the age at which half are older and half are younger — rose nationally from just over 35 years to nearly 38 years in the years between 2000 and 2016, driven by the aging of the “baby boom” generation.

The number of residents age 65 and older grew from 35 million to 49.2 million during those 16 years, jumping from 12 percent of the total population to 15 percent.

That’s a costly leap for taxpayers as those residents move to Medicare, government health care for seniors and younger people with disabilities, which accounted for $1 out of every $7 in federal spending last year, according to the Kaiser Family Foundation. By 2027, it will cost $1 out of every $6 of federal money spent. Net Medicare spending is expected to nearly double over the next decade, from $592 billion to $1.2 trillion, the KFF reported.

Sumter County, Florida, home of The Villages, a large retirement community, had the highest median age increase, rising from 49 years old in 2000 to 67 years old in 2016. Over that time period, 56 U.S. counties showed a median age increase of 10 years or more.

BOOM IN YOUNG PEOPLE

The Census report also showed that children in the U.S. born from 2001 through 2016 were the nation’s fastest-growing age group, with a 6.8 percent jump in the year beginning July 1, 2015. Other age groups either lost or gained population by less than a percentage point, according to the Census Bureau.

That means more demand on taxpayers for schools, bilingual education and accommodations for English language learners, as well as recruiting a corps of educators that reflects the nation’s students. Robert Hull, executive vice president of the National Association of State Boards of Education, said a majority of students in the U.S. are not white, but that 82 percent of teachers are white.

“It’s not just the services offered or what we do for the students but who is delivering those services,” Hull said.

The number of English language learners in U.S. public schools was about 4.6 million in the 2014-2015 school year, according to the National Center for Education Statistics.

FACE OF A NATION

All race and ethnic groups grew in the year before July 1, 2016, the Census reported.

The Asian population and those who identified as being of two or more races grew by 3 percent each, to 21 million and 8.5 million, respectively. Hispanics grew by 2 percent to 57.5 million. The black population grew by 1.2 percent to nearly 47 million.

The number of non-Hispanic whites grew by only 5,000, leaving that population relatively steady at 198 million of the nation’s 325 million people.

A Pew Research Center analysis of the Census’ current population survey found that white turnout increased in the 2016 election, while black turnout dropped and the nonwhite share of the U.S. electorate remained flat compared with the 2012 election.

“Any sort of impact on politics may be several decades in the future,” said Mark Hugo Lopez, director of Hispanic research for the Pew Research Center.

California had both the largest number of whites and non-white Hispanics in 2016, 30 million and 15.3 million, respectively.

Texas had the largest numeric increase in both the white and non-white Hispanic populations.

As for the share of a state’s overall population, New Mexico had the highest percentage of nonwhite Hispanics at 48.5 percent. Maine had the largest percentage of whites, nearly 97 percent.

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Ken doll gets new skin tones!

http://flip.it/kv18tp

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Thank you!

MHW Collage 2017

Thank you to everyone who helped make Multiracial Heritage Week a success again this year!

Since its inception in 2014, we have received state proclamations from Alabama, California, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Massachusetts, Missouri, New Jersey, North Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Washington, and Washington, DC. This year we also reached out to city mayors in addition to states. We held numerous celebrations and special events for the children throughout the United States because at Project RACE, it’s about the kids! We gave them “skin tones of the world” multicultural crayons with paper plates to draw their own faces, also librarians and Project RACE members read them stories. Additional thanks go out to Patti Barry, Kim Carlucci and Carolyn Brajkovich for all their help. We could not have done it without you!

Living AFTER Loving

Living After Loving

by

Susan Graham

June 12 is the 50th Anniversary of Loving v. Virginia, the landmark decision by the Supreme Court that made interracial marriage legal in the United States. We were legally able to marry someone of another race, which I did in 1981. Life didn’t change much for my husband and me in those days. No one taunted or insulted us and we rarely got those crazy stares that some interracial couples report. Then we had children.

My children are multiracial. You might also call them biracial, mixed-race, or other terms. Terminology is important. We choose to use “multiracial” because it is inclusive and covers people who are not only two, but even more races. A Pew Research Center analysis recently found that one-in-seven infants were multiracial or multiethnic in 2015—that’s a whopping 14% of the population and is nearly triple the number in 1980. That’s huge. In Hawaii, 44% of infants are multiracial or multiethnic. Our children’s population will only continue to grow. What we call them—and what they answer to—will be vital to their future. I personally do not like the term “mixed.” It just hits me the wrong way, so I really thought about it one day. Why do I find the word so distasteful? I think it’s because “mixed” is the opposite of “pure,” and do we really want to separate people by purity? Perhaps it’s my Jewish heritage that puts me at odds with that terminology.

Multiracial Heritage Week (June 7 to 14) is also celebrated to coincide with the anniversary of the Loving Decision. It is a national celebration of multiracial children, not interracial marriage. We hold this annual event because inclusion also matters and there are real benefits to seeing yourself represented. At 14 percent of the population, you bet multiracial people matter. They matter to elections, advertisers, corporations, media, and the United States Census Bureau, which tracks them as “two or more races,” over the preferred terminology of “multiracial.” Our families have to live with that for now, but certainly not forever. Diversity starts with the decision makers, and the bigger the multiracial population gets, the more they will listen to us—at least that’s the hope.

 

Our Partner at Harvard!

“Other: An Exploration of Race and Multiracial Identity” done by our Multiracial Heritage Week partners: https://www.we-are-other.com/

HAPPY MULTIRACIAL HERITAGE WEEK!

HAPPY MULTIRACIAL HERITAGE WEEK!

Check back here all week for lots of news on Multiracial Heritage Week!

Famous Friday!

Shemar Moore

Moore

Shemar is a forty-seven year old American actor and model. He is best known for his role in the Young and the Restless, Malcolm Winters. His father is African-American. His mother is white with Irish and French-Canadian ancestry. Shemar has stated his birth name was taken from his parent’s first names which were Sherrod and Marilyn, Shemar. He explained that in his parents were very proud of their interracial relations however, it was still socially inacceptable in the sixties and seventies. His parents wanted his name to be a remembrance of the love they had for each other. Shemar’s parents allowed him to embrace both his white and black side and did not want him to have to pick a side.  Shemar has stated he does not see himself as a black actor. He stated “I am very proud to be black but I’m as much black as I am white.” “I am very aware, especially in this country, that I am perceived and viewed as a black man because of the color of my skin. I am extremely proud to embrace the white side of me. In a perfect world, my wish is for people to see past color stereotypes and simply look at the character and personality of a person.”

Makensie Shay McDaniel

Project RACE Teens President

Famous Friday

FAMOUS FRIDAY: Muhammad Ali

Ali 1

Ali 2

 

When my mom was my age she had the incredible opportunity to work for the great Muhammad Ali as his boxing career winded down. Muhammad rose to fame as the result of the incredible boxing skills that earned him the nickname “the Greatest”.  He was three time heavyweight champion of the world even though he had to sit out what should have been his athletic prime. But being an incredibly gifted athlete only takes a man so far. Muhammad had many other unique gifts that contributed to him becoming the most famous man on the planet and one of the most loved people to ever live. Muhammad had the gift of gab that kept people entertained and earned him a second nickname, “the Louisville Lip”.  He also had deep conviction and courage that compelled him to stand up and speak out in favor of civil rights and against war. On of the most meaningful contributions he made to society was the impact he had on the self esteem of African Americans at a time where some in the US still considered them to be second class citizens. Muhammad was proud of being black and made others proud too.

 

When you are as famous as Muhammad Ali, the world knows a lot about you, but not many people know that the Champ was actually multiracial. His grandfather, Abe Grady, was a white Irishman from Ennis, Ireland and emigrated to the United States in the 1860s where he made his home in Kentucky and married an African-American woman who had been freed from a life of slavery. Grady and his wife had a daughter named Odessa Lee. Odessa married Cassius Clay Sr and on January 17, 1942, Cassius junior was born. He was named after his father and a famous Kentucky abolitionist but later changed his name to Muhammad Ali when he converted to the Islam faith.

 

Muhammad visited Ireland a few times later in life and the people of Ennis made him the first freeman of the town in its 150,000 year existence and consider him their favorite son. in 2009 he was given the Freedom of Ennis. A monument marking the spot where Muhammad’s great grandfather lived was also unveiled by Ali during his 2009 visit.

 

The Greatest, Muhammad Ali passed away at a hospital in Phoenix, Arizona at 74 after a long and difficult battle with Parkinson’s disease. He will never be forgotten.

 

Photo credit: Irishcentral.com

Photo credit: my mom and Muhammad from her personal collection

Karson

Pew Research Report

You can read the new Pew Research Report on Interracial Marriage in the United States here:

http://assets.pewresearch.org/wp-content/uploads/sites/3/2017/05/19102233/Intermarriage-May-2017-Full-Report.pdf