For Your Information

For Your Information

 

I have recently come under scrutiny by two members of the “mixed race” community. They verbally attacked me on social media because I do not use the term “mixed.” I prefer the term “multiracial.” That is my personal preference. I feel that everyone should use the terminology with which they are most comfortable.

 

I was recently speaking with the mother of one of our Project RACE Teen members who told me her son used “multiracial” and “mixed” interchangeably and was that OK? I assured her that was absolutely fine and that he should use the terms in his comfort zone. I am hardly the mixed police.

 

However, I would like to clear up any misconceptions about terminology. I prefer “multiracial” for the following reasons:

 

  • In 1993 the federal government asked that the multiracial community choose one term that they could consider for the 2000 Census and federal forms. They could not accommodate more than one word. All of the multiracial organizations chose the term multiracial. Project RACE polled every one of our members to find out their preference. Multiracial was the preference with biracial second.

 

  • “Mixed” never felt right to me and to many other members of the multiracial community. When I thought about it, I realized that mixed was the opposite of “pure.” I did not want to go backwards historically into a division of pure and un-pure people. It would be wrong, I felt, for me to use that terminology, especially in today’s world.

 

  • Hundreds of articles in newspapers, magazines, and online, have titled their articles about multiracial children “Mixed Up” or some negative use of the word “mixed.” They were called “mixed nuts” in at least one movie. Why make it easy for them to do that?

 

  • When Barack Obama was President, if a news outlet referred to him as multiracial, they used the term “multiracial.” Did you ever ask yourselves why? Because it’s a respectable term and everyone deserves to be identified with respectable terminology.

 

  • Words are important and it is important to give multiracial children appropriate and respectable terminology to use, especially when asked the question, “What are you?” Whether this is multiracial, biracial, mixed, or something else is up to you and your family and remember that it’s about the children.

 

The two individuals who attacked me and Project RACE are somewhat known in the “mixed race” community. One is a librarian of other people’s writing and the other is a member of a local group, yet they felt the need to verbalize their apparent upset with us. I am not sure why they are attempting to discredit us. I am extremely proud of the work of the members of Project RACE, the only national organization advocating for the multiracial community for over three decades.

Susan Graham

Famous Friday

Famous Friday: DeShone Kizer

Deshone Kizer and Family
Last week my hometown Cleveland Browns played their 2017 preseason home opener against the New Orleans Saints and, man was I excited to get a look at our second round draft pick, DeShone Kizer. He did great. In June, Kizer signed a four-year, $4.94 million contract with the Browns that includes $2.42 million guaranteed and a signing bonus of $1.73 million. But the starting QB slot for the Browns is still very much up for grabs.

The strong-armed 6’4″ Kizer is working hard to grab it and his performance last week may go a long way! He has been trying to show his grasp of Hue Jackson’s offense. He’s returning to the field following practice for extra work. He has run additional sprints and simulated plays he didn’t get to run in practice all by himself. Bud Shaw of Cleveland.com said, “If there were a bucket and a squeegee, he’d turn his attention to the practice facility’s windows.”

“[The coaches] have a good idea of when a quarterback is ready to go out there,” Kizer said. “I think the way that they’ve thrown me into the fire in the last couple months has allowed me to grow quickly and to become comfortable pretty fast.”

Kizer grew up in nearby Toledo, Ohio with his parents, Mindy and Derek, brother, Dayven and sister, Maelyn. Both of his siblings are still in high school. Dad Derek was a college basketball player and DeShone followed in his father’s footsteps by playing basketball in high school, but he also played baseball and football, which kept him busy year round. His high school coach thought he could have been a top collegiate basketball player, but thankfully for Cleveland fans, he chose to pursue football at the next level. DeShone played college ball at Notre Dame and as he began his career in the NFL said, “I will forever be Irish at heart.”

And, one of the youngest players on the team, at just 21 years old he surely has a bright future ahead in pro football. Many believe he’s going to be one of the great ones! After last week, I’m a believer. And I sure hope so, because the Browns have been waiting a long time.

— Karson Baldwin, Project RACE Teens Co-President

Photo Source: heavy.com

Commentary

Commentary in The Orlando Sentinel by Susan Graham, president of Project RACE:

http://www.orlandosentinel.com/opinion/os-ed-biracial-conundrum-over-which-box-to-check-20170814-story.html

Project RACE Denounces White Supremacy

Project RACE Denounces White Supremacy

The Board of Directors of Project RACE denounces white supremacy, white nationalists, and neo-Nazis, Ku Klux Klan, white nationalists, and the “alt-right” for their blatant racism and hate rally in Charlottesville, Virginia over the past weekend. Project RACE will always stand against any persons who threaten the multiracial community and any other minority group.

The hateful speech and deplorable actions by a few resulted in deaths and injuries and must be stopped before they are allowed to thrive and spread violence. We acknowledge President Trump’s later comments about the situation, but vehemently and negatively respond to his spreading the blame to “many sides.” There are not many sides to this evil behavior. There is right and there is wrong. The evil events of the weekend included domestic terrorism, which calls for complete and swift investigation and severe repercussions.

Some of the protesters shouted “blood and soil,” (“Blut und Boden”) a Nazi rallying cry that stresses that ethnic identity is based on only pure blood descent and the territory in which an individual lives.

Project RACE stands firm with other groups and individuals that resolve to swiftly take any necessary and peaceful solutions to cease hateful speech and actions by white nationalists and other extremist groups.

Famous Friday!

Zoe Kravitz

Zoe Kravitz

Zoe is the multiracial daughter of Lisa Bonet and Lenny Kravitz. Her parents are both multiracial. She is an American actress, singer, and model. Zoe’s parents were married for six years, but divorced when she was five years old. Zoe struggled with racial identity issues as well as anorexia and bulimia. Growing up she felt like a chubby, awkward brown girl around a bunch of blonde girls led to an eating disorder in her teens. Her famous father’s supermodel girlfriends’, and the fact that her mom in her eyes is the most beautiful woman in the world. She has stated when she was younger she did not know what it meant to be black. Growing up she attended predominately private white schools and she reported she felt “just as white.” She now believes her school environment made her want to blend in or not be looked at as black. “The older I get, the more I experience life, I am identifying more and more with being black, and what it means- being more and more proud of that and feeling connected to my roots and history.” She thanks her dad for her growth because he has always been very connected to his history and it was important to him that she understands her heritage. Zoe now states those days of not embracing her heritage are far behind her. “Now I’m so in love with my culture and so proud of my black heritage.”

Project RACE Teens President

Makensie  Shay McDaniel

Picture credit C Magazine

Missouri? Really?

What people are talking about…

Missouri. In recent days, the NAACP issued a travel advisory to warn minorities about the dangers of traveling through the state. This is the first time the org has ever put out a warning like this. It comes as a response to a state law passed earlier this year that requires anyone suing a company for wrongful termination because of discrimination, to prove that was the explicit reason they were fired. Prior to this, workers just had to prove it was part of the reason. The state says the new law – which goes into effect later this month – is ‘pretty standard’ and brings Missouri in line with similar requirements across the country. But the NAACP is calling this a “Jim Crow” law. And says there have been other incidents recently – including “racist attacks” at the University of Missouri campus – that make traveling or living in the state risky for minorities. The NAACP’s Missouri branch put out this advisory in June, and now the national office is saying ‘we’ll adopt it too.’

Please note: Missouri is one of our states that celebrates Multiracial Heritage Week.

Source: The Skimm

Category: Blog · Tags: , , ,

Affirmative Action?

What people are talking about…

Affirmative action. Yesterday, it came out that the Trump administration plans to investigate and sue colleges if they’ve used affirmative action to discriminate against white applicants. Affirmative action has been around since the ’60s and sets policy for places like schools and employers to give minorities and women an assist in getting a spot. The Justice Dept. has an entire civil rights division that looks into things like discrimination in college admissions. But the Trump administration will be scrolling through LinkedIn to build a new team focused just on this. Supporters say it’s long overdue because affirmative action is no longer an effective way to get the best people in the door and that it can lead to discrimination of other groups. Critics say it will discourage universities from accepting minorities. The Justice Dept’s saying ‘no comment.’

Source: The Skimm

Famous Friday

Lonzo Ball

 

Photo Credit: Sports Illustrated

FAMOUS FRIDAY: LONZO BALL
 
On June 22, 20 year old Lonzo Ball was selected with the second overall pick in the 2017 NBA draft by the Los Angeles Lakers.  Lonzo is a “one and done player” out of UCLA, who played one year of college ball with the Bruins as required by the NBA before turning pro. Lonzo is expected to be a revolutionary, Magic Johnson type of player, and he is living up to the hype. He has won countless awards. During the 2017 NBA Summer League, Ball led the event in double-doubles and triple-doubles recorded becoming the Summer League’s MVP by averaging 16.3 points, 9.3 assists, 7.7 rebounds, 2.5 steals, and 1.0 blocks per game. Ball also was named to the NBA Summer League first team.
 
Lonzo’s father, Lavar, has created quite a stir in the media. He generates a lot of publicity for Lonzo and his other superstar sons. His tweets get almost as much attention as Donald Trump’s. Some people say Lavar Ball is an annoying loud mouth, but others think he is a marketing genius. Lavar played college basketball and a bit of pro football and first wanted to date his wife, Tina, who was also a college athlete, because he thought they would make great athletes together. He was right. Basketball was the families priority from the start and Lonzo’s two younger brothers, Lamelo (freshman in high school) and LiAngelo (junior in high school), have also been offered basketball scholarships from UCLA! 
 
They have established the Big Baller brand and have already launched their first shoe, the ZO2, which is priced at $495!!! This is going to be fun to watch.
 
– Karson Baldwin, Project RACE Teens Co-President

Category: Blog · Tags: , ,

Save the Census

Save the Census

Photo

A census bureau worker in Houston in 2010. Credit Johnny Hanson/Houston Chronicle, via Associated Press

An administration uninterested in staffing federal agencies, at war with facts and eager to help Congress cut the budget is further endangering a cornerstone of American democracy: the duty to count all who live here.

Every decade since 1790, as required by the Constitution, the federal government has undertaken a painstaking census of its people, the accuracy and fairness of which serves the interests of both political parties and of every citizen. The decennial count is used to apportion seats in the House of Representatives and set the boundaries of congressional districts. It determines how tens of billions of dollars in federal aid are divvied up.

The Government Accountability Office already put the 2020 census on its list of high-risk projects early this year, due to uncertainty about its budget and technology, and Americans’ increasing distrust of government data collection.

Then, the Census Bureau’s director, John Thompson, who was expected to remain on the job until at least the end of the year, resigned in June. Mr. Trump has not named a permanent replacement. The agency’s deputy director, Nancy Potok, an experienced statistician, left in January, and she also has not been replaced.

Responses to mail-in questionnaires — still the chief data collection method for the census — and door-to-door interviews have been declining for years, a G.A.O. report said.

The bureau hopes to bolster its door-to-door “clipboard” force by automating the force’s work and introducing online reporting. But there’s not much money to test whether the approach actually works on the census: The bureau scrapped three field tests slated for this year, and two more for next year, including tests among rural people, who are traditionally one of the most seriously undercounted populations. There’s also less money to protect the online system from hacking of the kind that crashed Australia’s online count last year.

The census has always been vulnerable to political attack, and is especially so now. In 2009, Tea Party conservatives in the House tried unsuccessfully to kill off the bureau’s annual American Community Survey, a continuing tracking of respondents’ occupations, education, homeownership and other topics, as a supposed intrusion on privacy. A joint study by the American Enterprise Institute and the Brookings Institution this year calls the survey data “indispensable” in helping local governments plan.

Mr. Trump poses an additional threat: His repeated efforts to discredit voter registration data and government employment numbers leave census officials worried that a random tweet from him could discourage more people from participating. Census professionals worry that the administration’s efforts to deport undocumented immigrants could make them wary of providing information about themselves and where they live.

The census is the federal government’s chief source of data about the American people and economy, a sweeping endeavor. “If you don’t do the investment at the front end, you can’t fix it later,” says Max Stier, chief executive of the Partnership for Public Service, a nonpartisan advocate for a more effective federal government.

The census begins on April 1, 2020, and it must be completed in the summer for congressional reapportionment and redistricting to take place. Any failure would be immediately apparent — and it would tar Republicans at the height of the 2020 primary campaign season. Perhaps that reality will help inspire congressional leaders to support an accurate count, demonstrating to Americans that, even in the age of Trump, facts matter.

Census Problems

California would be the primary victim in a GOP war on the census

The 2020 census is headed for a debacle, and California is among the states most likely to be victimized by it.

Every 10 years, the Constitution requires the federal government to “enumerate” the nation’s residents. The count — traditionally accomplished by mailed questionnaires and house visits — determines political apportionment and the allocation of federal funds for the next decade.

The problems faced by the 2020 census begin with its unrealistically low budget. At mostly Republican insistence, it is set at the same level as the 2010 census budget, so it doesn’t account for a decade’s worth of inflation, or for population growth — and there will be an estimated 25 million more people in the U.S. by 2020. On top of that, the Census Bureau is using new technology to reduce door-to-door counting, and thanks to the bureau’s meager funding, it is far behind on testing it.

The 2020 census’ predicament is dire enough that in February, the Government Accountability Office added the census to its “high-risk list” of vulnerable agencies and programs. Then in June, the Census Bureau’s director abruptly resigned without explanation. Strong leadership in the buildup to a census is vital, but the Trump administration still has not named a successor.

Source: LA Times