Famous Friday!

Misty Copeland

 

Misty Danille Copland is an American ballet dancer with the prestigious American Ballet Theatre (ABT). On June 30, 2015, she became the first African-American female principal dancer in ABT’s 75-year history. She was born on September 10, 1982 in Kansas City.

 

Copland is biracial, of African-American, German, and Italian ancestry. Her hometown is Los Angeles and she lives in Manhattan.

 

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Advantages of being Multiracial

Mixed-race relationships are making us taller and smarter: Children born to genetically diverse parents are more intelligent than their ancestors

  • Researchers analysed genetic information from more than 100 studies 
  • These included details of 350,000 people from urban and rural communities
  • The team found that greater genetic diversity is linked to increased height
  • It is also associated with better cognitive skills and higher education levels 

 

As the world becomes more connected and cultures merge researchers are starting to see how this is playing a role in our evolution.

A study has found humans today are taller and more intelligent than their ancestors, and the cause has been linked to the rise in more genetically diverse populations.

And those born to parents from different races and cultures also tend to have higher levels of education.

Research has found humans today are taller and more intelligent than their ancestors, and the cause has been linked to the rise in more genetically diverse populations. And those born to parents from different races and cultures also tend to have higher levels of education. A stock image of a mixed-race family is pictured

Research has found humans today are taller and more intelligent than their ancestors, and the cause has been linked to the rise in more genetically diverse populations. And those born to parents from different races and cultures also tend to have higher levels of education. A stock image of a mixed-race family is pictured

Researchers from the University of Edinburgh analysed health and genetic information from more than 100 studies carried out around the world.

These included details on more than 350,000 people from urban and rural communities.

They pinpointed instances in which people had inherited identical copies of genes from both their mother and their father – an indicator their ancestors were related.

ONE IN 10 COUPLES MIXED RACE

Nearly one in 10 couples are now ethnically mixed, according to recent research.

It found there are 2.3 million people living as part of a mixed couple in the UK and their numbers have gone up by more than a third in a decade.

The report also found that 833,000 children, some seven per cent of those under 16 or still at school in England and Wales, are being brought up in a home led by an ethnically-mixed couple.

The count of ethnically mixed couples was taken from the 2011 national census results. The most likely people to be living in a mixed relationship are those whose parents were ethnically mixed themselves, the report said.

The figures on inter-ethnic relationships were compiled by the Office for National Statistics.

Where few instances of this occur in a person’s genes, it indicated greater genetic diversity in their heritage and the two sides of their family are unlikely to be distantly related.

It had been thought that close family ties would raise a person’s risk of complex diseases but the researchers found this not to be the case.

The only traits they found to be affected by genetic diversity are height and the ability to think quickly.

The team found that greater genetic diversity is linked to increased height. It is also associated with better cognitive skills, as well as higher levels of education.

However, genetic diversity had no effect on factors such as high blood pressure or cholesterol levels, which affect a person’s chances of developing heart disease, diabetes and other complex conditions.

The findings suggest that over time, evolution is favouring people with increased stature and sharper thinking skills but does not impact on their propensity for developing a serious illness.

Dr Jim Wilson, of the University of Edinburgh’s Usher Institute, said: ‘This study highlights the power of large-scale genetic analyses to uncover fundamental information about our evolutionary history.’

Researchers analysed genetic information from 100 studies, including details on more than 350,000 people. Conversely, genetic diversity had no effect on factors such as high blood pressure or cholesterol levels, which affect a person's chances of developing heart disease, diabetes and other complex conditions

Researchers analysed genetic information from 100 studies, including details on more than 350,000 people. Conversely, genetic diversity had no effect on factors such as high blood pressure or cholesterol levels, which affect a person’s chances of developing heart disease, diabetes and other complex conditions

‘Our research answers questions first posed by Darwin as to the benefits of genetic diversity,’ Dr Peter Joshi, of the University of Edinburgh’s Usher Institute added.

‘Our next step will be to hone in on the specific parts of the genome that most benefit from diversity.’

The study is published in the journal Nature and was funded by the Medical Research Council.

Source: Daily Mail

Biracial Dating

Want to be attractive to online daters? Be biracial.

 

In politics, it’s called the “Obama effect.” When it comes to attraction, you might call it the Rashida Jones effect. Or Halle Berry. Or Aubrey Plaza. Or Derek Jeter.

Like our president, the celebrities we consistently rank among the most beautiful can check at least two boxes under “race” on their census forms. But what about the judgement-prone zone of online dating, where we assess our potential matches first and foremost by their looks? Is our cultural open-mindedness making us more attracted to faces that look different from our own?

A new study presented to the Council on Contemporary Families and published today in the American Sociological Review suggests yes — online daters aren’t always attracted to people who look like themselves. In some instances, multiracial daters are getting a lot of right swipes. 

Looking different “could be beneficial rather than a reason to be discriminated against” in the online dating game, said study co-author Ken-Hou Lin, assistant professor of sociology at the University of Texas at Austin. Examining millions of initial messages sent between straight men and women between 2003 and 2010 on a large U.S. dating site, the researchers found that the premium placed on daters who self-identified as only white wasn’t as high as they originally thought.

Asian-white women got the most attention, with more positive responses to their opening lines from white and Asian men than women who checked only “white” or only “Asian.” (Olivia Munn, we’re looking at you.)

Other findings of note: Hispanic women preferred men who identified as Hispanic-white above all else. Hispanic men were less selective — they liked Hispanic women, white women and Hispanic-white women about the same. White women responded to white men and Asian-white men the most, followed by Hispanic-white men and black-white men.

Among all groups, Lin said men didn’t play racial favorites as much as women did. Except when it comes to black women, who were responded to the least.

That doesn’t surprise D.C. Tinder and Hinge user J.Q., a 24-year-old black woman who agreed to be identified only by her initials. “People sort of like the whole ‘ambiguously ethnic thing’ because it’s still safe,” she says. You can experience new cultures and ethnicities without going so far outside your comfort zone, she said of dating people who are biracial.

She’s even come across profiles of men who explicitly say they’re looking for “exotic” or “mixed” girls. “Why did you feel the need to put that?” she asks. “It’s kind of gross.”

In an OkCupid blog post from last September, co-founder Christian Rudder wrote that racial bias among users may have even gone up slightly over the last five years. While fewer users actually say they prefer one race over the other, Rudder said the data shows their online behavior — i.e. whom they hit on virtually — remains racially split among black and white lines. (The data did not distinguish whether those users identified with more than one race.)

And yet it’s undeniable that this country’s racial landscape is becoming more varied. According to a recent Pew report, nearly 7 percent of U.S. adultsidentify as two or more races. More than half of respondents said they’d been subjected to racial slurs or jokes, but only 4 percent saw having a mixed racial background as a disadvantage.

In the online dating market, you don’t even have to prove you’re mixed raced to get more attention; just saying so is enough. Ken-Hou Lin said biracial profiles without any photos performed about as well as those profiles with photos. “There’s a certain societal imagination about what mixed-race people should look like,” Lin said, pointing out how pop culture has shaped the way we see uniqueness and differences as attractive.

For J.Q., our app-dater, the majority of dates she’s been on have been with black men. But that’s not to say she wouldn’t date someone of a different race — as long as his profile suggests he’s a decent person. Evidence of a college education also doesn’t hurt. Neither does a good joke.

“If I see, ‘There’s always money in the banana stand,’ ” in someone’s bio, she says, “or another reference to Arrested Development, I’ll probably swipe right.”

Source: The Washington Post

 

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Quote of the Day

“Social change is better achieved by being for something than against something.”

                                               Helene Gayle, CEO

Thank you, Alabama!

This is very interesting, considering that the Governor of ALABAMA has joined us by issuing a proclamation for the state to celebrate Multiracial Heritage Week! -Susan

Census shows Alabama growing older, producing fewer babies

Alabama is growing slightly more diverse, while also producing fewer babies, according to a U.S. Census report released this week.

The new figures on age and race within states and counties show that half of Alabamians were older than 37.9 years of age in 2010. That median — or middle mark — is now up to 38.6-years-old as of 2014.

That’s because Alabama saw about 10,000 fewer young children from 2010 to 2014. The Census shows 305,000 children under the age of 5 in 2010. That was down to 295,000 in 2014.

The new report is broken down by race, and the decline can be seen across racial and ethnic groups. White and black, Hispanic and Native American, all saw fewer young children in Alabama in 2014.

There was a slight increase in recent births among the state’s small Asian population. But the only category to see any sizable growth among the youngest members were those reporting as “two or more races.”

That was the fastest growing category for race or ethnicity from 2010 to 2014, climbing from 64,000 Alabamians in 2010 to 75,000 in 2014. Nationwide, about 2.5 percent of Americans now answer as “two or more races.”

Meanwhile, Alabama has seen a steady year-over-year rise in the number of residents over the age of 65. For instance, Alabama had about 77,700 residents over the age of 85 in 2010. That had climbed each year to reach 83,600 residents over 85 in 2014.

The Census report this week shows Maine with the highest median age at 44.2 and Utah as the most youthful state with a median age of 30.5.

Within Alabama, the new numbers on race and ethnicity show that Pickens County saw the largest jump in Hispanic population, climbing 170 percent since 2010. But that’s still fewer than 1,000 residents in the small county.  Most counties saw more modest gains.

Only Barbour, Tallapoosa, Montgomery, Jefferson and Chilton saw a drop in the Hispanic population since 2010. Jefferson County, home to the state’s largest Hispanic population, dropped about 3 percent from about 25,500 Hispanic residents to just under 24,900 in 2014.

Mobile County has the largest Native American population at about 4,000 residents. Jefferson has the state’s largest Asian population at 10,500 residents, followed by Madison County at 9,000.

There were slight changes in terms of white and black demographics.

Macon and Greene counties continue to have the highest percentage of black residents at just over 80 percent, while Winston and Cullman in north Alabama continue to have the highest percentage of white residents at just over 96 percent.

However, all four counties had grown slightly more diverse in the last four years. For instance, Macon County went from 83 to 81 percent black as the county shrank. Winston went from 97 to 96 percent white as the small black population doubled.

The Census released overall population estimates for states, counties, metro areas and cities earlier this year.

Alabama in 2014 had 4.85 million residents. The new report shows about 70 percent are white, 27 percent are black, nearly 2 percent are “two or more” races and 1 percent are Asian. Here’s the racial breakdown and median age for the state’s four most populous counties.

White Black Native American Asian Two or more Median age
Jefferson 54.0% 42.9% 0.3% 1.6% 1.1% 37.5
Madison 60.1% 35.3% 1.0% 2.0% 1.5% 38.3
Mobile 69.4% 24.6% 0.8% 2.6% 2.5% 37.2
Montgomery 38.9% 56.7% 0.3% 2.6% 1.3% 35.6

Updated at 9:45 a.m. on June 28, 2015: Readers have requested data for Hispanic residents. The Census separates race and Hispanic origin. Residents are asked to identify as white and Hispanic, or white and non-Hispanic, black and Hispanic, black and non-Hispanic, etc.

Overall 4.1 percent of Alabamians in 2014 identified as Hispanic, up from 3.8 percent in 2010. Here are the five counties with the largest Hispanic population. Each sits in North Alabama and each is home to the state’s massive chicken industry.

County Total Hispanic Hispanic %
Franklin 31601 5078 16%
DeKalb 71065 10096 14%
Marshall 94636 12254 13%
Blount 57719 5042 9%
Morgan 119607 9496 8%

Medical Update

ws / Canada

Canadian cord-blood bank will provide stem cells to treat host of diseases

A Canadian Blood Services packaged cord blood unit. The organization is launching a national cord blood bank, with the goal of creating an ethnically diverse reservoir of stem cells to improve the chances of helping more Canadians.

Canadian Blood Services

A Canadian Blood Services packaged cord blood unit. The organization is launching a national cord blood bank, with the goal of creating an ethnically diverse reservoir of stem cells to improve the chances of helping more Canadians.

Canadian Blood Services officially launched a national public cord-blood bank Thursday, with the goal of collecting and preserving samples that reflect the country’s broad ethnic diversity.

The bank, which will draw donated newborn cord-blood samples from five hospitals in Vancouver, Edmonton, Ottawa and Brampton, Ont., was set up to provide a source of stem cells for Canadians across the country.

Two facilities — one in Edmonton and the other in Ottawa — will test, process and freeze individual units of cord blood, which can be stored indefinitely.

Canadian Blood Services has raised $12.5 million of the $48-million cost of running the program for the next eight years, with provincial and territorial governments (excluding Quebec, which has its own cord blood bank) picking up the balance.

Placental and umbilical cord blood are rich sources of blood-forming stem cells that can be used in the treatment of more than 80 diseases and disorders, including cancers such as leukemia and lymphoma.

“Every day here in Canada, we have about 1,000 people who are looking for a stem cell transplant,” Heidi Elmoazzen, director of the bank, said from Ottawa.

About 25 per cent find a suitable donor among family members. But 75 per cent must look for an unrelated adult donor whose bone marrow or peripheral blood provide a close tissue match to prevent rejection.

The majority of donors on these adult registries are Caucasian, so finding a match can be extremely challenging for people of certain ethnicities, said Elmoazzen.

“We have a lot of ethnic groups here in Canada that you don’t find in the rest of the world, such as our First Nations, Métis and Inuit populations,” she said. “And then we also have a lot of mixed marriages here in Canada, so you get a lot of unique ethnicity mixes.”

Patients of mixed race, Caribbean black, African or Aboriginal descent “are very, very hard to match,” she said.

Two of the hospitals, in particular — BC Women’s in Vancouver and William Osler Health System’s Brampton Civic Hospital northwest of Toronto — are on track to change that because of the populations they serve.

Joanne Flewwelling, executive vice-president of clinical services for William Osler, said the majority of the patients served by the hospital are of Asian or South Asian descent.

“That is what made us so attractive to Canadian Blood Services, because there is a challenge in general of having stem cells matched for patients, particularly for those that come from diverse ethnic backgrounds,” she said.

Of the 900 cord blood samples donated by new mothers to date at the Brampton, Ont., hospital, about 75 per cent came from babies of non-Caucasian descent.

Dr. Jan Christilaw, president of BC Women’s Hospital, said Vancouver and nearby areas are home to people of many ethnic backgrounds, in particular the Chinese- Canadian community, “which was very central to lobbying for this (cord blood bank) to come and for fundraising for it.”

Many of the new mothers who deliver at the hospital are First Nations, so the donations of their newborns’ cord blood would enrich the bank and ultimately help other indigenous Canadians in need of a stem-cell transplant.

B.C. is also home to populations of Sikhs and other South Asians, Vietnamese, Japanese and Filipinos.

“Some of the mixed racial groups are the hardest to find a match for,” Christilaw said. “So the more diverse the bank is, the better the chance that if you really need cord-blood stem cells for any particular reason, you’ll be able to find it.”

Building a broad-based reservoir of cord blood will not only provide stem cells for current patients, but the bank will also be a source of these regenerative cells in the future when more is known about the extent of their powers to heal, she said.

“We said 80 diseases, but 10 years from now, we might be up to 500.”

Source: Sheryl Ubelacker The Canadian Press, Published on Thu Jun 25 2015

THE STORE IS OPEN!

Our brand new Project RACE store is now open for business on our website at www.projectrace.com

 

Get some t-shirts and multicultural skin tones of the world crayons–they are very cool!

T-shirt Lexi

 

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The Census Bureau Explains

A report came out today from the Census Bureau. This is how they explain the “combination” (multiracial) population:

Unless otherwise specified, the statistics refer to the population who reported a race alone or in combination with one or more races. Censuses and surveys permit respondents to select more than one race; consequently, people may be one race or a combination of races. The detailed tables show statistics for the resident population by “race alone” and “race alone or in combination.” The sum of the populations for the five “race alone or in combination” groups adds to more than the total population because individuals may report more than one race. All references to age, race, and Hispanic origin characteristics of counties apply only to counties with a 2014 population of 10,000 or more. The federal government treats Hispanic origin and race as separate and distinct concepts. In surveys and censuses, separate questions are asked on Hispanic origin and race. The question on Hispanic origin asks respondents if they are of Hispanic, Latino, or Spanish origin.

Starting with the 2000 Census, the question on race asked respondents to report the race or races they consider themselves to be. Hispanics may be of any race. Responses of “some other race” from the 2010 Census are modified in these estimates. This results in differences between the population for specific race categories for the modified 2010 Census population versus those in the 2010 Census data.

Multiracial Spider-Man!

Cutting through stereotypes: Marvel now has a multiracial Spider-Man

We’ve all known Spider-Man’s real identity. He is Peter Parker. He is also white and straight male. But does that identity apply to all his fans across the world? Are they all white and straight? No. In fact, somehow all ‘American’ superheroes could fit that identity. A country that claims to be multicultural, can hardly boast of its heroes to be the same.

But change is around the corner. In recent years, comic books have dared to break the white, straight, male stereotype. In an alternate story line, or you could say universe, Wolverine and Hercules were portrayed to be in love with each other. Batwoman, Kevin Keller (from Archie comics) among others, can be added to that list. And Thor Girl, is just as awesome as Thor, if not more. And of course, a muslim teen Miss Marvel. All these heroes are a reflection of the changing dynamic.

Now, Spider-Man too is about to break those comic book stereotypes.

Miles Morales as Spider- Man. YouTube screengrab

According to a Daily News report, Miles Morales, a multiracial teenager, is about to take over web-slinging duties of the friendly neighborhood superhero.

Miles Morales portrayed Spider-man in an alternate “Ultimate” storyline to much appreciation from fans. Now, as Marvel prepares to relaunch Spider-Man, Miles Morales will replace Peter Parker in fall 2015. Peter Parker was killed off in the “Ultimate” storyline.

Miles Morales is the teenaged son of an African-American father and Puerto Rican mother, representing a multicultural America, and not just one made for caucasians.

Quote of the Day

“You don’t have to be multiracial to care about multiracial people.”

                                                                                             -Thomas Lopez

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